VOLUME 38 | ISSUE 6 | NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2018

Original Article Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font

Persistence of hepatitis B surface antibody and immune memory to hepatitis B vaccine among medical college students in Madinah

Waleed Mahallawi

From the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Taibah University, Madinah, Saudi Arabia and Department of Clinical Infection, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom 

How to cite this article:

Mahallawi W. Persistence of hepatitis B surface antibody and immune memory to hepatitis B vaccine among medical college students in Madinah. Ann Saudi Med 2018; 38(6): 413-419.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Globally, about 300 million people are infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Among the effective approaches to fight HBV infection is immunization. In 1989, an obligatory hepatitis B vaccine program was launched in Saudi Arabia. 

 

OBJECTIVE: Assess hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels among the medical students before and after receiving booster doses of HBV vaccine.

 

DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

 

SETTING: Taibah University.

 

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Students born between 1993 and 1995 were recruited in this study from the Occupational Health Clinic. Students were screened for anti-HBs levels using chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) before and after booster HBV vaccine doses. 

 

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anti-HBs levels before and after booster doses. 

 

SAMPLE SIZE: 335.

 

RESULTS: About half of participants (n=164, 49%) had protective anti-HBs levels (≥10 mIU/mL) to the original primary series of HBV vaccine and received no booster doses. The reimaining 171 (51%) participants were at risk of HBV infection since their anti-HBs levels were <10 mIU/mL, despite having received the original primary HBV vaccine. The levels of anti-HBs were higher in female than in male students (P<.001). In addition, female students showed a stronger humoral immune response to the booster vaccine than male students (P<.001). When participants were given the three boosters, most participants (98.3%) showed anti-HBs levels of ≥10 mIU/mL. The results also showed a strong correlation between pre-booster and post-booster anti-HBs levels in the ≥10 mIU/mL group (r2= 0.52, P<.001) but not in <10 mIU/mL group (r2= 0.003, P=.53).

 

CONCLUSION: A considerable portion of the participants (about 51%) were at risk of HBV infection since their anti-HBs levels were <10 mIU/mL. Booster doses significantly trigger memory immune response and this ensured their protection against the virus. Pre-booster anti-HBs level are a good predictive of post-booster anti-HBs levels in ≥10 mIU/mL group.

 

LIMITATIONS: The sample size was small. Shortage of collaborators.

 

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: None. 

 

 

In this article

Submit Your Manuscript Here:

Indexed in:

Social

LinkedIn
cron